11/5/14 - Surfing Saves, Weightlifting Kills

During my stay in Fiji last week, I had some amazing conversations with some amazing people. One conversation I had there, is one I’ve had literally hundreds of times. I’m talking about the “weightlifting is dangerous” conversation.

Since he’s become a good friend, I’ll use the example of my conversation with a good man named Scott. He’s had some back trouble and is extremely hesitant towards weight training.

This issue is one of those unique cases where the urban legend is so widely communicated that it’s become ubiquitously assumed as gospel. “Weightlifting kills backs.”

Meanwhile, Scott was motivated by the few fun training sessions a few of us had on the island to get back to New York to get back into ju jitsu. Now, I love everything about ju jitsu, but we should at least agree that it isn’t inherently safe. It’s fighting. In fact, Scott broke his arm training it. Yet, in his mind, like that of most people, lifting weights is a death sentence.

Chronically fighting another human being? “Safe and sound.”

Chad fell hard. Feel better, bro!

Chad fell hard. Feel better, bro!

I had to chuckle when folks unsolicitedly gave me the “I would, but I can’t..” (in fear of injury) treatment after seeing the group workout. Meanwhile, the entire island is catapulting themselves into the reef at high speeds.

Surfing? “Safe and sound.”

I’m not taking jabs at ju jitsu or surfing here. Both are beautiful practices that I only hope my life includes more of. This conversation is one about false perception. The thing about danger and strength & conditioning isn’t even that there is a debate to be had. It’s that it just isn’t true. There’s nothing there, especially when speaking relatively.

 

Logan Gelbrich

@functionalcoach

11/5/14 WOD

Complete the following for time:

800m Run
-Rest 3 minutes-
800m Run
-Rest 3 minutes-
800m Run
-Rest 3 minutes-
800m Run
Then, accumulate:
60 Dips
100 Banded Good Mornings