8/2/16 - On Injury and Human Movement

If you’ve ever talked to the average man or woman who’s had an injury before, they’ll tell you all about it. These are individuals that often can’t name another piece of their anatomy, but will glean in telling you about every damaged ligament in their elbow in Latin. Most people that had their time in a doctors office or, God forbid, on an operating table start rattling out terms that they’ve memorized from their specialist’s run down with them. “Yea, no.. it was a degenerative L5 and a partial bulge in the L6/S1..”

I’m not saying we should be anatomy nuts. Quite the contrary, but it’s as if we take pride in our ailments. As a coach, we hear it all the time. I can’t tell you how many students have a list of caveats that precede what they can do and that’s fine. I’m a firm believer in understanding the reality of the state of our bodies, but let’s keep moving the needle, people. It’s time to get better. Someone once told these injured folks they had a knee issue or a back issue or a bad shoulder and that imprint stayed in their mind as an unchanging reality that they must report upon.

Here’s the toughest piece of this matter. We’re all fucked up. Training rarely causes it, but it often allows for it to manifest. Said differently, if a basic functional movement gives you pain then you have an issue. It’s not the movement’s fault, it’s your disfunction. Furthermore, avoiding the movement isn’t as simple as avoiding pain, it’s avoiding the issues that are there regardless. With this logic, when people tell me, “Man, I’d train but it just makes my [issue] flare up.” What I hear is, “I secretly enjoy being damaged goods for the rest of my life because it’s way easier that dealing with my body.”

Granted this is a tough article to write because I’m generalizing about real observations and providing a message that needs to be heard but, there may be people reading this that do have issues that need to be out of movement and need to seek treatment. What I will say, however, is that considering what’s possible an injury is nothing to be proud of.

If you have a thing, adapt or find a way to correct it. At the end of the day, this phenomenon where people take pride in being the victim may never end because it will always be easier to have a thing than it is to take ownership and advance yourself into better movement.We can shine a light on it, nonetheless.

I have half a bicep that any orthopedic surgeon would take my money to operate on. I watched and listened to my own meniscus tearing just turning oddly to face someone in the office. I’ve coached people 48 hours post operation. The list goes on. If you want a free pass, there’s a million viable options in all of our bodies for the taking. As they say in baseball’s Spring Training, however, “you can’t make the club in the tub.” The “tub” of course is in reference to the ice tub in the training room.

If you want to be hurt, you’ll be hurt. If you want to take ownership of yourself, you’ll take ownership.

 

Logan Gelbrich

@functionalcoach

8/2/16 WOD

EMOM 20

Minute 1: 10 Toes to Bar

Minute 2: 5 Push Presses (135/95)

Minute 3: 10 Pistols

Minute 4: 200′ Sled Push